Officer Unidentified Shoots At Snake, Kills 5-Year-Old Boy

Officer Unidentified Shoots At Snake, Kills 5-Year-Old Boy

Postby J29 » 06 Aug 2007, Mon 10:31 pm

Stray Bullet Kills Boy Fishing in Okla.

NOBLE, Okla. -- A police officer shooting at a snake apparently killed a 5-year-old boy who was fishing at a nearby pond, officials said.

Austin Haley was fishing with his grandfather, Jack Tracy, when Tracy said he heard a shot and saw something hit the water just a few feet in front of the boat dock where he was standing.

Moments later, a second shot hit Austin in the head.

A Noble police officer who had responded to a report of a snake in a tree apparently fired the deadly shot while trying to kill the snake on Friday, City Manager Bob Wade said.

"I was told that they tried several ways to get the snake down, but it was still hissing at them and firmly lodged," Wade said. "What I was told is that the owner of the home either suggested or agreed that they should go ahead and shoot the snake, and then everything happened from there."

Tracy thought someone must be trying to kill him and his grandson, so he put the child on the back of a 4-wheeler and drove to his daughter's house about 200 yards away.

"Then two officers came out of the brush over there," he told The Oklahoman. "They didn't tell us they were the ones who had been shooting or that they had shot him. They didn't admit a doggone thing."

The boy was pronounced dead at an Oklahoma City hospital, about 25 miles north of Noble.

Wade refused to identify the officer but said the person had been placed on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation.

"This is so bizarre it has to be fully investigated," he said. "We're pretty sure circumstantially that it is the bullet from the police officer's gun, but it might be a bullet from someone else."

Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation spokeswoman Jessica Brown said a state investigation was under way, though it appeared the fatal shot had been fired by the officer.

Tracy has little doubt. "I'm not saying the cop shot him on purpose," he said. "But let me tell you _ if I had a kid and put him in this car and didn't put him in a car seat and he got killed on the way to town, they'd charge me with murder ... and what this cop did is a lot worse than that."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 00397.html
J29
Newly Registered User
 
Posts: 1
Joined: 06 Aug 2007, Mon 10:18 pm

Postby WaTcHeR » 10 Aug 2007, Fri 7:13 pm

A 5 year old boy, Austin Haley, fishing on a boat with his grandfather, was shot and killed on Saturday. The shots came from a Noble, Oklahoma police officer, who was shooting at a snake in a tree.

"Then two officers came out of the brush over there," he told The Oklahoman. "They didn't tell us they were the ones who had been shooting or that they had shot him. They didn't admit a doggone thing."

The Noble City Manager, Bob Wade, while admitting that they were "pretty sure" the office fired the shot that killed young Austin, nevertheless promised an investigation just to be sure. Apparently, the police received a call of a large snake in a tree. When the police arrived, there were numerous ways to get the snake down, but the homeowner urged the police to shoot it. And so they tried. And tried. Without recognizing that the bullets that missed the snake had to go somewhere.

Wade, the City Manager, refused to name the cop who shot Austin Haley.

The first part of this story is fairly straightforward. It's a basic accidental tragedy. A 5 year old boy shot dead by an errant bullet. Granted, one may question the thought that went into shooting at a snake in a tree in a populated area. In New York, this might well be the foundation for a charge of reckless endangerment, the classic example being shooting into a crowd without the intention of killing anyone in particular. A particularly aggressive District Attorney might seek a "depraved indifference" murder charge. But that, of course, might be the case when the shooter is a regular person.

This killer was a cop. Normally, the first thing done when a cop kills a person without obvious excuse is to heavily investigate the person to smear their memory. If the cops are really lucky, they will dig up some drug crime history, or maybe even some violence, so that the news stories that follow talk about how the police officer shot a vicious drug dealing murderer. But it's hard to pin much on a 5 year old. They just haven't had the time yet to do anything really bad.

Also curious is the reluctance to concede that the cop killed Austin. Unless the magic bullet from the Kennedy assassination is still sailing through the air, there were no other bullets around. They know it. They don't exactly deny it. But they won't just admit it either. It's nice to see offialdom having some doubts that a person killed another, even when the situation leaves little. But then, the shooter is one of their own.

But most striking about this situation is the reluctance to name the cop who shot and killed Austin Haley. Protecting the identity of the victim is the usual response. Protecting the shooter is not. Except this time. Do we really need to know the name of the cop to appreciate the tragedy of what happened to Austin? No, of course not. The name is a detail of little consequence to the story. But that's true so many times, but honored only here. The concern shown for the cops sensibilities, as I have no doubt that he's heartbroken by what happened, and his reputation, which will be ruined by his stupidity if not his actions, is endearing. It's a shame that this concern is so rare.

And so the death of 5 year old Austin Haley provides only two lessons. First, even on a pond, fishing with your grandfather, there are risks that could take a young boy's life. Second, if you're going to do something really stupid that ends up with your killing a young boy, it's good to be a cop.


http://blog.simplejustice.us/2007/08/06 ... sultsChart
"Cops that lie, need to die!" A police officer that lies to get an arrest or send someone to prison should be shot.

"In the U.S., a cop with a gun can commit the most heinous crime and be given the benefit of the doubt."

"The U.S. Government does not have rights, it has privileges delegated to it by the people."
User avatar
WaTcHeR
Moderator
 
Posts: 8268
Joined: 04 Mar 2007, Sun 1:25 pm
Location: Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

Postby KC » 20 Aug 2007, Mon 4:05 pm

I would be curious to know the name of the person that murdered my son, but this happening in Oklahoma they may never release the name of they officer.

Oklahoma = Police State
http://www.policecrimes.com

"A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against its government."
User avatar
KC
Assistant Moderator
 
Posts: 1336
Joined: 05 Mar 2007, Mon 11:12 pm

Officer Brad Rogers and Officer Shawn Richardson

Postby WaTcHeR » 11 Sep 2007, Tue 7:57 pm

Noble officers charged with manslaughter

Prosecutors filed second-degree manslaughter charges Friday against two Noble police officers involved in the Aug. 3 accidental shooting that claimed the life of 5-year-old Austin Haley of Noble.

Officer Brad Rogers, 34, and Officer Shawn Richardson, 29, are expected to turn themselves in to authorities next week, said Cleveland County District Attorney Greg Mashburn.

Officer Rogers, who had been on the Noble police force approximately one month, was the officer who reportedly twice fired a .357 semi-automatic handgun in a residential area, attempting to shoot a snake in a bird house. One of the two shots struck Austin Haley in the head while he was fishing at a nearby pond with family members.

Sgt. Richardson was the supervising officer at the scene, Mashburn said.

"Being a member of the law enforcement community made the decision more difficult," Mashburn said. "At the end of the day, I looked at the law and visited with the family and made the decision based on the law."

Mashburn said he "thoroughly reviewed" OSBI reports and "personally walked" the scene of the shooting.

The second-degree manslaughter is based upon "culpable negligence," Mashburn said.

"Culpable negligence is defined as the omission to do something a reasonably careful person would do," Mashburn said. "Based on my review of the OSBI report and my viewing of the scene, I concluded these officers failed to do something that a reasonably careful person would do by firing a weapon at a non-poisonous snake that was stuck in a birdhouse without knowing what lay behind their location."

Mashburn said he looked at other cases involving accidental deaths, and determined there "must be some level of accountability for the officers involved."

Several family members attended Mashburn's afternoon press conference at the Cleveland County Office Building.

"Just because they wear a uniform doesn't mean they're above the law," said Cheryl Tracy, Austin's grandmother. "If they had just used their brains, our grandson would not have been shot."
"Cops that lie, need to die!" A police officer that lies to get an arrest or send someone to prison should be shot.

"In the U.S., a cop with a gun can commit the most heinous crime and be given the benefit of the doubt."

"The U.S. Government does not have rights, it has privileges delegated to it by the people."
User avatar
WaTcHeR
Moderator
 
Posts: 8268
Joined: 04 Mar 2007, Sun 1:25 pm
Location: Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

Postby WaTcHeR » 11 Sep 2007, Tue 8:01 pm

Officer Brad Rogers of Noble Oklahoma is a moron to say the least.
"Cops that lie, need to die!" A police officer that lies to get an arrest or send someone to prison should be shot.

"In the U.S., a cop with a gun can commit the most heinous crime and be given the benefit of the doubt."

"The U.S. Government does not have rights, it has privileges delegated to it by the people."
User avatar
WaTcHeR
Moderator
 
Posts: 8268
Joined: 04 Mar 2007, Sun 1:25 pm
Location: Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

Postby WaTcHeR » 16 Mar 2008, Sun 9:04 pm

NORMAN -- The family of a 5-year-old boy who was killed when a bullet from a Noble police officer's gun struck him is angry that a plea agreement between the officer and the state requires no jail time.

Cleveland County prosecutors have offered deferred sentences to two former Noble police officers charged with second-degree manslaughter in the Aug. 3 death of Austin Haley.

"It's nothing more than a slap on the wrist, if you ask me," Jack Haley, the boy's father, said Tuesday.

Haley said sentencing for Paul Bradley Rogers, 34, and Robert Shawn Richardson, 29, would be deferred for two years in exchange for them entering guilty pleas. The men also would be fined $1,000 each and ordered to forfeit their state law enforcement certifications, he said.

Assistant District Attorney David Brockman declined to confirm that an offer has been made in the cases.

"We know the family is unhappy, but we can't comment on cases that are pending," Brockman said.

Haley said Brockman and District Attorney Greg Mashburn told the family on Monday about the offer.

The family most objects to the provision that doesn't require the men to serve any jail time, Haley
said.

"This sweetheart deal doesn't serve us; it doesn't serve justice, and it doesn't serve the public," he said.

The family still is grieving the loss of a child, Haley said, "and now this. This just makes it worse. We're the victims here, and we don't feel like we have an advocate."

Austin Haley died when a bullet from one of the officers' guns ricocheted and hit him while he was outside fishing with his grandfather. The officers were in a neighbor's yard, firing at a snake in a birdhouse.

Jack Haley said the family wanted the men to serve "maybe 30 to 90 days."

"They killed somebody because of their negligence. They shouldn't get deferred sentences that can be expunged from their record after two years are up," he told The Oklahoman.

Brockman said prosecutors have kept the Haley family informed of the case's progress.

But Haley said until Monday he thought prosecutors were talking about some jail time, "like, maybe 30 days."

On Monday, he said, the family learned that the two men had waived their rights to a preliminary hearing and that a disposition date for the cases had been set.


http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article. ... NORMA88676
"Cops that lie, need to die!" A police officer that lies to get an arrest or send someone to prison should be shot.

"In the U.S., a cop with a gun can commit the most heinous crime and be given the benefit of the doubt."

"The U.S. Government does not have rights, it has privileges delegated to it by the people."
User avatar
WaTcHeR
Moderator
 
Posts: 8268
Joined: 04 Mar 2007, Sun 1:25 pm
Location: Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

5 Year Old Kid Gets Killed By Cop in Nobel

Postby WaTcHeR » 19 Mar 2008, Wed 7:24 pm

<object width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/LD3ZYFOSj2Q&hl=en"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/LD3ZYFOSj2Q&hl=en" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></object>
"Cops that lie, need to die!" A police officer that lies to get an arrest or send someone to prison should be shot.

"In the U.S., a cop with a gun can commit the most heinous crime and be given the benefit of the doubt."

"The U.S. Government does not have rights, it has privileges delegated to it by the people."
User avatar
WaTcHeR
Moderator
 
Posts: 8268
Joined: 04 Mar 2007, Sun 1:25 pm
Location: Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?


Return to Stupid Ass Police Officers and Their Actions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 4 guests